SOFOBOMO: Done, sort of

M6TTL, ZM Biogon 35 F2, FP4+, Xtol

M6TTL, ZM Biogon 35 F2, FP4+, Xtol

Well, today was a productive day. I gave myself a haircut which Kate won’t have to spend too much time fixing, and I finished my SoFoBoMo book. Get it here:


this is not there

Update 6/17/2009: I realized this morning that my ‘finished’ book is actually fairly far short of the required 35 photos. I’m happy with it the way it is though, so I’m disinclined to add photos to fill it out. At the same time, I’m not entirely comfortable claiming the finishers badge on sofobomo.org, so I’ve decided to take the book off the official site. The book will remain available on my site at the link below.

I’m quite satisfied with the end result of the project. That I came in under the 35 photo minimum is somewhat irrelevant to my own goals. I put together a collection of photos that I like and got them into a book format that makes me fairly happy. I’m going to call that a success.

this is not there, the unfinished edition

11 Replies to “SOFOBOMO: Done, sort of”

  1. Congratulations on finishing.

  2. Excellent work, Matt.

  3. They came together beautifully. Taken in a “book” series, they have a very Ralph Gibson feel to them – which I very much mean as a compliment.

    Max

  4. When I read your book, I did not count images – in fact I was so captured by the captures that I didn’t even waste any thought on this. Your book is a great body of work, and I enjoyed thoroughly your findings and framing. Great body of work, my sincerest congratulations.

  5. All, thanks for the kind words.

    Markus, clearly I wasn’t counting either. I just pulled my favorites out of the 45 or so images that made it through the rough cut. I didn’t actually count them out until this morning. Oh well.

    I’m quite happy with the book, and that’s what counts.

  6. Not a dud there but it definitely is a ‘short story’ in terms of the number of prints: you made the right editorial decision. The cover picture is stunning and nothing quite matches that one even if all have grace and elegance. Although I understand your point about what you want to photograph, I do feel slightly barred from seeing the wider picture in some of the shots that limit the DOF: but then I am always after the maximum I can get from a picture!

  7. John, thanks for the feedback. I’ve always liked the short story form, so I’ll take that as a compliment. I do sometimes wonder if I use shallow DOF too often, but it still fascinates me. Kate says I seem to be refining minimalism. If I keep going, perhaps I’ll end up with nothing in focus!

  8. matt – nice job. And of course, like Colin’s book, I tend to like all the ones John doesn’t so much. There’s one with a fork handle(?) on a diagonal that I particularly like.

    If you want to see the oof taken to extreme, check out Sugimoto’s book Architecture: fabulous piece of minimalist photography.

  9. Martin, thanks for the feed back. I’ll check out the Sugimoto. The ‘fork handle’ is an abandoned snow shovel wedged into some pipes on the neighbor’s house. Ugly pretty when the light hits it right.

  10. I think I have a new favorite – the picture on page 5 – the line of the umbrella with the out of focus background.

    I go to Germany tomorrow for what promises to be a difficult, intense negotiation – but the place is wonderful – Bavaria and a small, very unspoiled village. Strange place for an international agreement, but the world is unlikely.

    I had earlier decided not to take a camera. After going through your photos again, the fifth time I think, I changed my mind. The Leica comes with me. Thanks.

    Max

  11. So this is the solution to the puzzle. Every time I’ve browsed through the list of finished books, I saw yours, and when I clicked on it, I was told I’d have to be you to see it 🙂

    Anyway. I finally did the research, found it, and it was well worth the effort. I really love this series of very idiosyncratic images. I like the style, the formal repetitions, the “plain viewing”, to put it in Mark “The Landscapist” Hobson’s terms.

    Oh, and I didn’t count either 🙂

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