Heat, D76, Tri-X, Burgers

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It’s been hot here, into the upper nineties and hotter for a week until last night. D76 isn’t great at high temperatures. Something about one of the developing agents working faster than the other, and the contrast builds quickly above 72F even if you adjust your times. It had been a while since I’d used D76, and I’d forgotten this if I’d ever known it. I’d also forgotten how smeary it can make Tri-X look. Not a sharp combo, particularly not compared to a film like TMY2 in XTOL or Tmax developer. Sharpness isn’t everything, but it’s something, and when also aren’t getting great shadows, it’s hard to love D76 as a 35mm developer.

But the burgers were good . . .

82F

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, HP5, XTOL 1+1, 82F, 6 minutes

I’ve finished up shooting for SOFOBOMO 2010. I’ve still got a bit of post processing to do (and redo -see the middle of the set on flickr), but I’ve got a pretty good idea of what I’ve got to work with. See the last post for a link to the set.

In other news, it’s going to break 100F today. When I developed a roll of HP5 yesterday, the developer came out at 82F even after being cut with ice water. HP5 has longer development times than TMY2, but it was still a brief 6 minutes in the soup. I should write post one day about developing in the heat, something I first learned to do in South Korea, and something I’m having to relearn in DC as we don’t have central AC.

Silk Shirt: Neopan 400, D76 and Fortuitous Mistakes

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These, and the photos in the preceding post, are from a couple of rolls of Neopan 400 developed in D76 1:1 for 6.75 minutes at 72F, which is a minute and 45 seconds less than the Fuji data sheet recommends. This wasn’t intentional. I misread the time/temp conversion chart. I seem to be doing this a lot lately, but in this case, it turned out fine, good enough, in fact, that I repeated the ‘mistake’ again this morning with two more rolls, although this time I went for 7 minutes – round numbers are easier to time.

Lately I’ve been biasing my exposures to the shadows more heavily than I have in the past, so between that and the under development, I’ve probably pulled the film a bit. Seems to be working for me. I’m also playing around with some new scanning techniques. More on that later.

For the record, these shots are actually Freestyle’s Legacy 400. Although the edge markings are slightly different, it seems to be Neopan 400. Mixed in with a roll of Neopan 400, the density came out identical to my eye.

Kate’s Parents Have Cats

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, Neopan 100ss, Rodinal 1:100

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, Neopan 100ss, Rodinal 1:100

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, Neopan 100ss, Rodinal 1:100

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, Neopan 100ss, Rodinal 1:100

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, Neopan 100ss, Rodinal 1:100

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, Neopan 100ss, Rodinal 1:100

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, Neopan 100ss, Rodinal 1:100

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, Neopan 100ss, Rodinal 1:100

and I am massively allergic.

This Neopan 100ss is not bad stuff. The purple tint takes some extra washing to clear, but no problems other than that. Developed in Rodinal 1:100, 72F, 16.25 minutes, 30 seconds initial agitation, 3 inversions per minute thereafter.

Fieldtrip to the Parking Deck

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, TMY2, Rodinal Stand

TMY2 in Rodinal stand is . . . uh . . . interesting?

Neopan 1600 Revisited

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, Neopan 1600, D76 1:1

M6TTL, CV 35 1.4 SC, Neopan 1600, D76 1:1

This is the first roll of Neopan 1600 I’ve shot in a couple of years. In the past, I’ve had good luck shooting Neopan at 1250 or 1600, but I’d always developed it in speed enhancing or compensating developers like T Max or Diafine, neither of which I’ve got at the moment. With that in mind, I shot the roll at 800 and developed in D76 1:1 expecting the down rating to more than compensate for the D76’s lack of toe boost. Time and temp were based on Fuji’s own data sheet, 6 minutes at 72 degrees. Although the results were fine, there’s not nearly as much shadow detail as I expected. Part of this may be the choice of subject, Kate dressed in black in patchy sunlight, but I suspect that the more likely culprit is underdevelopment/under exposure. Internet fora are filled with folks who’ll maintain that Neopan 1600 is really more like a 650 film that pushes well. Before this roll, I viewed this position as suspect, although now I’m inclined to believe that I underestimated how important a role the choice of developer played in my previously favorable impressions of this film. I’m giving D76 another go, with a slight time increase, but if that doesn’t prove fruitful, I’ll look at other developers for my remaining rolls of Neopan 1600.